Category: Municipal Health

New developments on the Regulation governing general hygiene requirements for food premises and the transport of food

According to World Health Organisation statistics, an estimated 600 million people in the world fall ill because of contaminated food. A shocking 420 000 of these cases result in deaths.

The National Department of Health is responsible for ensuring the safety of food in South Africa. To this end, the Department promulgates relevant legislation to regulate the production, distribution, and preparation of food.

New innovations in food production, as well as the re-emergence of food-borne diseases, require that legislation is amended to address changing conditions and environments.

The National Department of Health promulgated REGULATIONS GOVERNING GENERAL HYGIENE REQUIREMENTS FOR FOOD PREMISES, THE TRANSPORT OF FOOD AND RELATED MATTERS, R 638 OF 22 JUNE 2018 under the FOODSTUFFS, COSMETICS AND DISINFECTANTS ACT, 1972 (ACT 54 OF 1972) 

The Municipal Health Department of Garden Route District Municipality has the legislative responsibility to enforce Regulation 638 in its area of jurisdiction. With the additions to Regulation 638, it is deemed necessary to communicate the application of the regulation to the general public.

Take note: Regulation 638 replaced Regulation 962 of 23 November 2012 and Regulation 918 of 30 July 1999. Certificates of Acceptability (COA) issued in terms of repealed regulations, expire on 22 June 2019. This means that all food premises, new and existing, have to be in possession of a new Certificate of Acceptability issued under Regulation 638 by said date under the name of Garden Route District Municipality.

Regulation 638 is applicable to every establishment that handles, prepares, transport and/or sells food to the general public. Accordingly, all such establishments are required to be in possession of valid Certificates of Acceptability (COA).

It is important to note that the Certificate of Acceptability is:

  • issued in terms of Regulation 5 and 6, addressing the Standards and requirements for food premises and the standards and requirements for facilities on food premises, respectively;
  • issued in the name of the person in charge of the premises and not in the name of the establishment. “Person in charge” is a natural person who is responsible for the food premises or the owner of the food premises;
  • Not transferable from one person to another person or from one food premises to another;
  • a person may not effect changes in respect of food premises for which a

Certificate of acceptability has been issued in terms of sub-regulation (5), relating to the provisions of regulations 5 and 6, without informing the local authority in advance and in writing of such changes; and

  • a Certificate of Acceptability must be clearly displayed on the food premises for which it was issued. Should display of a certificate be impractical, it should immediately be made available upon request by the Environmental Health Practitioner or the general public.

How do I apply for a COA?

  • A fully completed, written application form has to be submitted to the relevant local District Municipality, in this case, the Garden Route District Municipality.   An amount of R190.00 is payable as an administration fee for the 2018/2019 financial year.
  • If an Environmental Health Practitioner, after having carried out an inspection, is satisfied that the food

premise concerned, complies with the provisions of Regulations 5 and 6; a local authority in all respects, he or she shall issue a Certificate of Acceptability in the name of the person in charge.

 Does one need specific or specialised training as the person in charge of food premises?

The person in charge of food premises must ensure that –

  • He or she and any other person working on the food premises, are suitably qualified or otherwise adequately trained in the principles and practices of food safety and hygiene. The training must be conducted by an accredited training provider or by an Environmental Health Practitioner of the relevant District Municipality; in this case Garden Route District Municipality.
  • Assessments are conducted to determine the impact of the training.
  • Training programmes and records are kept and routinely updated and are made available to an Environmental Health Practitioner on request.
  • Evidence of accredited training must be submitted to the relevant District municipality before/on 22nd June 2019.

Please contact the Garden Route District Municipal Health offices in your area, should you need more information with regards to any aspect of the Regulation.

George: 044 8031522

Mossel Bay: 044 693 0006

Hessequa: 028 713 2438

Oudtshoorn: 044 272 2241

Knysna: 044 382 7214

Plettenberg Bay: 044 501 1600

ENDS

GRDM officials excel during 2018 SAIEH

The South African Institute of Environmental Health (SAIEH) in partnership with the Swiss Embassy, South African Local Government Association (SALGA), Department of Agriculture (Veterinary Service) and the City of Cape Town hosted the 21st National Conference in Environmental Health, at the City of Cape Town council chambers from 16-19 November 2018.

The theme of the conference “One Health – An Environmental Health Perspective”, aimed to demonstrate an integrative effort of multiple disciplines working locally, nationally and globally to attain optimal health for people, animals and the environment.

A proud Executive Manager of the GRDM Community Services with his research team and the Portfolio Councillor. Fltr: Ms Maxwelline Fatuse, Mr Gcobani Tshozi, Ms Jessica Erasmus, Ms Heidi Cronje, Ms Sive Mkuta, Mr Clive Africa (Executive Manager), Ms Wandile Magwaza, Mr Lusizo Kwetshube, Cllr Khayalethu Lose (Portfolio Chairperson), Ms Ivy Mamegwa and Ms Emmy Douglas.

The Garden Route District Municipality’s (GRDM) Executive Manager of Community Services, Mr Clive Africa attended the 4 (four) day conference, accompanied by his leading team of professionals within the field of Environmental Health. The GRDM Municipal Health Services (MHS) submitted nominations for the Best Municipality and Best Environmental Health Practitioner (EHP) awards. The Municipal Health App Project has been nominated for this Award. The Municipality has been awarded as one out of three municipalities, with the Best Environmental Health Project.

Since the implementation of the Municipal Health App, the GRDM Environmental Health Practitioners experience a lot of benefits in conducting their daily inspections.  The App assists EHPs to capture information electronically on site, without writing reports afterwards.  This method assists them to do more inspections and be more productive while they are out in the field and interventions can then be executed immediately. This method also enables EHPs to do more inspections and save more lives.

The GRDM resolved and implemented paperless council meeting agendas a few months ago in their effort to go green to save the planet.

Breakdown of inspections by GRDM

2013 – 2014 financial year – 31 351 inspections

2014 – 2015 financial year – 41 367 inspections

2015 – 2016 financial year – 43 122 inspections

2016 – 2017 financial year – 50 893 inspections

2017 – 2018 financial year – 51 986 inspections

Garden Route DM delegates with the awards received during the gala event.

Mr Francois Koelman, an EHP from the GRDM Oudtshoorn office received a trophy for being one of the Best Environmental Health Practitioners in South Africa. This award is also one out of three nominees at a national level.  Mr Koelman was not present during the award ceremony, but his colleagues received this remarkable award on his behalf. “We are very proud of our colleague and would like to congratulate him on this great achievement – hard work definitely pays off.”

The Saturday and Sunday’s jam-packed programme was attended by various intellectuals in the environmental health sector.  The GRDM research team (which was an initiative of the Executive Manager, Mr Africa), Ms Maxwelline Fatuse, Ms Jessica Erasmus, Ms Sive Mkuta, Ms Ivy Mamegwa and Mr Clive Africa presented scientific papers on the following research topics:

  • Adulterated honey in South Africa;
  • the effects of consuming toxic chemicals used in fake alcohol beverages on human health and the community;
  • counterfeit food; and
  • counterfeit medicine.
The GRDM Executive Mayor, Cllr Memory Booysen with the EHPs who delivered presentations on day 2 of the conference.

Ms Emmy Douglas who also acted as research supervisor and project leader, did a sterling job in coaching EHPs in delivering a quality research project and research presentations.

On Monday, a field trip was undertaken by delegates to the Goodwood Disaster Centre and the Swiss Housing project in Khayalitsha.

The last item on the program was the compilation and discussion of resolutions that were taken during the conference. One of the resolutions taken was to approach the National Health Laboratories and discuss their service delivery to the public. The possibility of establishing an accredited laboratory in South Africa, as most of the critical scientific testing can only be done overseas at a very costly price was also raised at the conference. Results for these complex tests also take a long time which could negatively influence the health of our communities.

Arabic posters about health and hygiene distributed to Knysna residents

The recent collaborative “Blitz” operations that were undertaken by various stakeholders, to inspect the informal ”spaza shop” sector, prompted Environmental Health Officials (EHPs) of the Knysna Municipal Health Services to assist South African citizens from foreign  countries that are currently conducting business within the greater Knysna, with health and hygiene awareness.

Initially, the language barrier was a huge challenge which exists between foreigners, especially the Moslim communities from Bangladesh, Somalia and Ethiopia. This inspired  EHPs from the Knysna office to design and  compile a  Health and Hygiene Awareness poster  in the most general – spoken  Arabic  dialect. These posters will assist shop owners with the legal requirements that are required within the applicable legislation as prescribed by the Foodstuff, Cosmetics and Disinfectant Act, Act 54 of 1972.

Mr James McCarty busy to train and educate the members of the Moslim business sector.

The following focus areas were included on the posters:

  • Procuring foodstuff from certified retailers.
  • Selling of compromised foodstuff.
  • Temperature control labelling.
  • Expired foodstuff.

This project is aimed towards the 2018 World Environmental Health Day theme of, “Global Food Safety and Sustainability” and will be rolled out to the other local authorities within the Garden Route District.

On Friday, 16 November 2018 during a ceremony that was held in Hornlee at the Knysna Musallah Mosquee, the posters were handed over to the designated representatives of the Moslim business sector community of Knysna by the local Environmental Health Practitioners, Mr James McCarthy and Mr Linden Herwells.

During the ceremony, the local Muslim business sector and the Imam of the Knysna Musallah expressed their gratitude towards this gesture.  They also committed themselves to provide safe food to the community of Knysna.

Public Awareness:  Vector Control

Vector control is an important component of many disease control programmes.  It is a cornerstone of very effective campaigns to control vector-borne diseases. For a number of diseases where there is no effective treatment or cure, such as West Nile Virus and Dengue Fever (not endemic to the Garden Route), vector control remains the only way to protect populations.

Vector control is any method to limit or eradicate the mammals, birds, insects or other blood-feeding arthropods, collectively called vectors, which transmit disease pathogens. Mosquitoes are the best-known invertebrate vector and it transmits a wide range of tropical diseases, including Malaria, Dengue and Yellow fever. Another large group of vectors is flies.

However, even for vector-borne diseases with effective applications, the high cost of treatment remains a huge barrier to a large number of developing countries. Vector-borne diseases are transmitted by the bite of infected arthropod species, such as mosquitoes, ticks, bugs and sand flies. Despite being treatable, malaria, which is transmitted by mosquitos in Africa, has by far the greatest impact on human health. A child in Africa dies of malaria every minute, although vector control measures that have been in effect since 2000, reduced fatalities with 50%.

As the impact of diseases and viruses are devastating, the need to control the vectors in which the disease or viruses are carried, continues to be prioritised. Vector control in many developing countries can have tremendous effects on mortality rates, especially among infants. The high movement of populations causes  diseases to spread rapidly – the Garden Route District cannot be excluded from this migration trend.

Control measures:

  1. Remove or reduce areas where vectors can easily breed. This will limit their growth, for example, the removal of stagnant water, riddance of old tyres and cans that serves as mosquito breeding environments.
  2. Limit exposure to insects or animals that are known disease vectors can reduce infection risks significantly, for example, window screens or protective clothes can help reduce the likelihood of contact with vectors.
  3. Chemical control by using insecticides, rodenticides or repellents to control vectors.
  4. Biological control, the use of natural vector predators such as bacterial toxins or botanical compounds can help control vector populations, for example, using of fish that eat the mosquito larvae.

Prevent vectors by wearing light coloured, long sleeved shirts and long pants, tucked into socks or boots. Use repellent on exposed skin and clothing, to protect yourself from being bitten by mosquitos, sand flies or ticks. Simple hygiene measures can reduce or prevent the spread of many diseases.

Avoid vector-borne diseases:

  1. Before travelling, vaccinate against diseases prevalent at your destination for example, Yellow fever. Antimalarial medicines is also available.
  2. Use window screens to control mosquitoes.
  3. Sleep under an insecticide-treated bed net, if in a place or area with a malaria risk.
  4. Check your body regularly for ticks. If you find one, remove it with a tweezers and apply a skin disinfectant. In a tick- infested area, check your clothing, luggage and other belongings.
  5. Avoid contact with blood, secretions, organs or other bodily fluids of infected people or animals.
  6. Make sure to keep strict hygiene control of food and avoid unpasteurised dairy products in areas where tick-borne diseases are prevalent.
  7. If bitten and did receive treatment abroad, please remember to complete your treatment course at home.
  8. If you become ill upon your return, tell your doctor where you have been, as you may have brought a disease back with you.
  9. Child care facilities should treat their sandpits with salt on a regular basis to prevent vectors.

Municipal Health team educates learners of Hoogekraal Primary School about health & hygiene

The Municipal Health team from the Garden Route District Municipality (GRDM), on Wednesday, 24 October 2018, surprised the learners and educators from the Hoogekraal Primary School near George, with a “different type” of health and hygiene training.

Juanita Samuels listens carefully and demonstrates to her fellow learners how hands must be properly washed.
The drama group “Youth for Change” performing various plays to educate learners about the importance of good health and hygiene practises. The group was formally trained by Garden Route District Municipality through a “Peer Educational Training Programme”.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The learners looked confused when the team arrived, but soon a change in atmosphere took place when Ms Lana Don, Environmental Health Practitioner from the Municipal Health office in George led them with a song “Hands, shoulders, knees and toes” where after she opened the event with a prayer.

The highlight of the event was when the “Youth for Change” drama group from Oudtshoorn performed various plays to convey messages relating to daily health and hygiene practises.

In the play, the learners witnessed how their “Grandmother” passed away in front of them due to poor health practises and unhealthy eating habits.  Seeing this happen, got some of them almost in tears. The young audience was not impressed with the bad and unhealthy lifestyle of their “Grandma” which ended up causing her death.

Learners and educators of the Hoogekraal Primary School, with the Municipal Health team from Garden Route District Municipality and the “Youth for Change” drama group, soon after the health & hygiene formal programme.

Ms Carike Jantjies, during her presentation to the learners focused on various aspects, such as the safe storing of food and the temperature in which food must be warmed up.  “Food must be stored in a temperature of no less than 5oC and must be heated in a temperature of 60oC or more,” she emphasised.  Ms Jantjies also enlightened the learners about Listeriosis, how it is borne and the dangers thereof.  Environmental Health Practitioner, Ms Janine van Wyk, with colleagues Ms Ivy Mamegwa and Ms Sive Mkuta, demonstrated proper hand washing techniques to the learners.  Ms van Wyk explained to the learners: “Do not only wash your hands, but also from the lower to the upper (middle) part of your arm”.  Ms Van Wyk furthermore reiterated that, hands must be washed after playing or after lunch breaks and after using the toilet.

Ms Emmy Douglas, GRDM Chief:  Municipal Health at the GRDM George office, thanked the school principal, Mr Grootboom, for warmly welcoming the team on their arrival and allowing them to educate the learners in respect of good health & hygiene habits. She extended a special word of gratitude to the drama group and said:  “You portrayed and conveyed the message to the learners in the best way possible, and we thank you”.

Mr Grootboom officially thanked the GRDM team and the drama group for making time and effort to reach out to the school.  He said: “It clearly shows that Garden Route District Municipality did not forget about our school’s existence. We truly appreciate this important outreach”.  Mr Desmond Paulse, Manager:  Municipal Health from the Oudtshoorn area, also attended the event.

Informal Food Traders from Mossel Bay receive training

 

The informal food trading sector in South Africa has a positive impact on micro businesses which contributes to job creation, poverty alleviation and establishment of breadwinners in communities.   The sector plays a critical role in food security, facilitating access to food by poor people living in urban areas and has the potential to expand the economic viability of the region.

To address the Key Performance Areas set for Environmental Health Practitioners (EHPs), the EHPs of the Garden Route District Municipality’s (GRDM) Mossel Bay office, facilitated an awareness training session, focusing on informal food traders selling offal on 3 October 2018, at the Asla Park Community Hall.   The aim of this type of training is to educate traders on basic food hygiene practices, as outlined in legislation and also to ensure that food being consumed does not pose health risks. The importance of safe, hygienic food handling and selling in the prevention of food poisoning outbreaks, are always emphasized during these events.

The thirteen Informal Food Traders from KwaNonqaba and Asla Park in Mossel Bay, after the training session conducted by the GRDM Environmental Health Practitioners, Mr Lukanyo Mafuduka (left) and Ms Neo-Lay Britz (right).

Fifteen Informal Food Traders from Mossel Bay attended the session. The following aspects were covered during the training:

  • registration of food stalls
  • food safety
  • food poisoning
  • how does one contract food poisoning
  • signs and symptoms of food poisoning
  • five keys to safer food, which entail:
  • keeping clean;
  • separating raw food from cooked food;
  • cooking food thoroughly;
  • keeping food at safe temperatures; and
  • using safe water and safe raw material.

Subsequently to the training session, interviews were conducted with participants who indicated that the training was significant. The session also confirmed that they were not familiar with some of the opportunities in Mossel Bay, and how it could benefit them. Attendees also indicated that they would appreciate if more training could be rolled out to them. Incentives such as cooler boxes, storage containers, meat trays, hairnets and aprons, were given to all the participants who attended the training

More training sessions will be conducted by the GRDM Environmental Health Practitioners throughout the year to ensure that safety and hygiene standards are met in order to protect the public.

Garden Route DM Outreach Programme benefits crèches in the George areas

Environmental Health Practitioners (EHPs) from the Garden Route District Municipality (GRDM) educated 22 pre-primary learners (including caretakers) at Nonzame Educare Centre about proper hand wash techniques on 10 October 2018.

EHPs with the toddlers and caretakers from Nonzame Educare Centre, during the outreach.

This crèche, which is situated in Thembalethu, George, benefited from an ongoing joint initiative between the GRDM Municipal Health Services Section and the Western Cape Department of Health. The awareness programme has been up-and-running since 2016.

The goals of the programme are straightforward – to instill preventative habits, such as proper hand wash techniques and to prevent disease spreading into the minds of children.

EHPs Mr Gcobani Tshozi (left) and Ms Sive Mkuta (right) demonstrated to the toddlers and caretakers of the Nonzame Educare Centre how hands should be properly washed.

During the visits, EHPs also focus on topics such as food safety, the importance of washing hands, personal hygiene, water quality management and safety, waste management, as well as chemical safety.  These topics form part of the “Health surveillance of premises and health and hygiene awareness” key performance area of the Environmental Health Practitioner.

According to Ms Khanyisa Shoto, an EHP and coordinator of the initiative, children learn best through their senses and benefit from doing, seeing as well as hearing. Ms Shoto added: “Our teams work together with principals to explore the obstacles that childcare facilities face in terms of environmental health issues”.

The EHPs who also formed part of the initiative were Mr Gcobani Tshozi, Mr Lusizo Kwetshube, Ms Ivy Mamegwa, Ms Wandile Magwaza, Ms Jessica Erasmus, Ms Lana Don and Ms Sive Mkuta.

Tips on proper hand washing

Follow these steps:

  1. Wet your hands with running water — either warm or cold.
  2. Apply liquid, bar or powder soap to a cupped hand.
  3. Lather well.
  4. Rub your hands, palm to palm, vigorously for at least 20 seconds.
  5. Rub your thumbs and in between your fingers. Wash up to the elbows.
  6. Rinse well.
  7. Dry your hands with a clean towel.

It is important to dry hands thoroughly after washing because some bacteria remain on a person’s hands after washing, and these are more easily spread via wet hands than dry ones.

World Environmental Health Day celebrated

Statistics from the Department of Health showed, that many children and adults are suffering from diseases, such as diarrhoea, which can be easily prevented or cured, but sometimes result in very sad consequences.

To address this problem, the Environmental Health Practitioners (EHPs) of the Garden Route District Municipality’s (GRDM) Klein Karoo municipal health office developed a drama production aimed at creating awareness among community members, especially school children.

The aim of the drama production was to:

  • promote good food safety practices;
  • educate learners and the community, on how germs and infections are transmitted;
  • improve hygiene behaviour; and
  • prevent the spread of diarrhoeal and other hygiene-, sanitation- and water related diseases in communities.

A local actor and four (4) peer educators were approached to assist with the performance.  The drama piece was also developed in commemoration of World Environmental Health Day, on 26 September 2018, themed – “Food Security and Sustainability”.

Actors and Environmental Health officials with some of the community members from Hoeko (Ladismith) who attended the information session.

On 24 and 25 September 2018, the drama production was performed respectively in Hoeko (Ladismith area) and in Dysselsdorp.  Approximately 216 households were reached through the initiative. Educators and community leaders were impressed by the informative messages that were conveyed. The actors demonstrated the relationship between good hygienic practices and health status towards a positive impact in community health and quality of life.

According to the organisers of the events, the initiative surely increased the self-esteem of community members, promoted health and hygiene awareness practices and empowered the community with knowledge, in order to take responsibility for their own health and life.

Mr Desmond Paulse, Manager Municipal Health: Klein Karoo (left) with the Peer Educators who performed in the drama production.

The drama production forms part of an ongoing health and hygiene education programme performed by the GRDM municipal health section.

World Environmental Health Day Celebrations

A highly successful event was held at the Thembalethu Community Hall, on Wednesday, 26 September 2018, in commemoration of Wold Environmental Health Day (WEHD), initiated by the International Federation of Environmental Health. This year marks the 7th celebration of the event in South Africa, in recognition of the need to improve environmental health to protect human health.

Cllr Khayalethu Lose, the Portfolio Chairperson of Community Services welcomed and thanked stakeholders for their attendance.

The theme for 2018 is “Global Food Safety and Sustainability”, aimed to support the provision of safer food, for people to make use of the precious water and nutrient resources and for communities to increasingly value sustainable food production, distribution and consumption.
After presentations, attendees were encouraged to ask questions and raised concerns.

Approximately 80 people, consisting of informal and formal food and meat traders, small farmers, caterers, crèche cooks and community members, from Thembalethu, were present at the interactive information session. The objectives of the event were to educate, share and discuss the legal requirements in the food industry as well as major threats to food safety, in particularly the incorrect handling of foodstuff; climate change; anti-microbial resistance; antibiotics in meat; food wastage and access to safe water and chemicals.

Mr Tony Dyers of the Veterinarian Service delivered an informative presentation on meat safety, followed by Dr Dyason of the Department of Agriculture, who shared facts about Rabies, the symptoms, causes, treatment and prevention of the disease in animals.
The Environmental Health Practitioners (EHPs) of the George Municipal Health Office furthermore enlightened attendees on counterfeit foodstuffs; “best before” dates and the five keys to safer food.
Similar celebrations were conducted in other areas within the Garden Route District, and according to the organisers of the event, the envisaged goals were achieved.

“What counts in life is not the mere fact that we have lived. It is what difference we have made to the lives of others that will determine the significance of the life we lead.” – Nelson Mandela

EHPs from Garden Route DM conduct Food Safety Blitz in Knysna

Public concern regarding the selling of “fake foods” compelled the National Department of Health to issue an urgent directive to investigate allegations made regarding the sale of food products, especially products not labelled in accordance with the REGULATIONS RELATING TO THE LABELLING AND ADVERTISING OF FOODSTUFFS, R146 OF 01 MARCH 2010.

According to Regulation 146:
– No person shall manufacture, import, sell or offer any pre-packed foodstuffs for sale, unless the foodstuff container or the bulk stock, from which it is taken, is labelled in accordance with these regulations.
– No person shall import, manufacture, sell, distribute or donate foodstuffs, unless a date marking is clearly indicated on the label or container of such foodstuff.
– The date shall be preceded by appropriate words “best before” and/or “use by” and/or “sell by”, depending on the nature of the product; Provided that abbreviations shall not be permitted, except “BB” for “best before”, but the preceding words shall be written out in full.
– The date marking may not be removed or altered by any person.

Consequently, a joint food safety “blitz” was undertaken by the Garden Route District Municipality: Knysna Municipal Health section on the 13th September 2018 in collaboration with the following stakeholders:
– Knysna S.A.P.S. officials
– Knysna Municipality Law Enforcement officials
– Knysna Municipality Environmental Practitioner

Environmental Health Practitioner issuing a fine to a shop owner who is not complying with Regulation 683 – Governing general hygiene requirements for food premises, the transport of food and related matters.

The safety “blitz” was undertaken at informal (“spaza shops “) situated within the different Greater Knysna areas.
The primary objectives of the joint operation focussed on the following:
– Compliance of premises in terms of the applicable legislation (Regulation 638 – Governing general hygiene
requirements for food premises, the transport of food and related matters)
– Compliance in terms of the Business Act – Act 71 0f 1991 (Knysna Municipality mandate)
– Criminal activities and offences (S.A.P.S. mandate)

Unlawful activity by a shop owner who stored food products in a bedroom.

The operation was facilitated by four Environmental Health Practitioners of the Knysna office and a total of 12 premises were inspected.
A total of 3 fines were issued to non-compliant premises and formal notices will be served on all premises that were visited, to address the non-compliance issues that were identified.
During the debriefing session that was held after completion of the successful operation, various issues and challenges were discussed; these issues will be prioritised during the next operations within the Greater Knysna area.