Medical male circumcision to benefit men and their partners

Media Release: Medical male circumcision to benefit men and their partners

16 October 2020

Primary Health Care clinics are  once again continuing services that were high risk during the peak of the pandemic. One of these are medical male circumcisions (MMC).

“Apart from drastically reducing the risk of HIV infection and other sexually transmitted illnesses, MMC also improves hygiene and reduces the risk of developing penile cancer and the risk of passing the virus that causes cervical cancer to their female partners”, said Programme Manager Sandra Smit.

Smit also elaborates on the great turn-out of young men during MMC outreaches.

“Our programme did really well, and although we had to postpone outreaches and procedures we are excited to get back on track and assist as many men as possible. We implore the youth to make the best decisions for their current and future health. One of those is getting circumcised. The new guideline focus on ages 15 years and older but we will not deny services of those that are younger. Boys under the age of 18 must have parental consent”, she said.

Twenty-year-old Luwayne Michaels says he had the procedure done to ensure he has a healthy family one day. “I wanted to minimize my risk for opportunistic infections, and the fact that I can reduce the risk of my partner developing cervical cancer made it easier to decide”.

MMC is the complete removal of the foreskin. The procedure requires only local anaesthetic and takes about 20 minutes. Patients can leave the facility and go home after the procedure. The wound takes about 6 weeks to heal.

Male Circumcision is not a guarantee that you will not get HIV. Men still need to use a condom each time they have sex, even if they have been circumcised.

Men who are interested should visit their nearest clinic or Primary Health Care Centre to make an appointment for the procedure.  The service is free of charge.

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Nadia Ferreira
Principal Communications Officer
Garden Route and Central Karoo Districts
Western Cape Government Health